Creating Strong Relationships with the Media

Creating Strong Relationships with the Media

Preparing yourself or your team for media interviews includes understanding how to create and maintain good relationships with members of the media. Over the years, I’ve interviewed members of the media from outlets that include The Associated Press, Los Angeles Times, Clear Channel Radio and many others. Here are some tips based on what they shared.

Let relationships develop over time.
Like friendships, some of your media relationships will be closer than others, and they develop over time. In their excitement over getting a live editor or producer on the phone or meeting one in person, some people will overestimate the relationship and assume that now they’re friends, buddies…amigos. If this sound like you, take a step back. Think of one of your close friends. When you met this person, did you glom onto him or her the first time you spoke or did you chat for a bit, establish common ground and let the relationship grow from there? Allow members of the media to get accustomed to you and to want to hear from you.

Don’t be intimidated, but know who owns the ball.
It’s easy to feel intimidated by someone who writes for the Wall Street Journal or who is responsible for booking interviews for Bloomberg Businessweek or Good Morning America, if you’re not used to speaking with people in these types of jobs. It’s important to remember reporters and TV and radio bookers need experts and people to interview you as much as you need them to share your message. However, keep in mind that if you were children playing in a schoolyard, you are playing with their ball: they make the rules. You can choose to follow the rules, or negotiate to alter them, or walk away.

Be responsive.
Return calls from the media promptly and provide information they have requested quickly. Many people miss fantastic opportunities for top-level TV, radio and print interviews because they don’t respond quickly enough. Even if you don’t feel ready for an interview when a media opportunity arises, return the call and either negotiate a different time to do it or politely and graciously decline.

Be easy to work with.
Be kind, respect their time, never be pushy, and appreciate that they have opinions and may or may not like what you have to offer. Help members of the media when you can with additional information or resources and be a pleasure to work with. Sounds like life, doesn’t it?

Read more media relations tips at https://expertmediatraining.com/media-training-tips-for-good-media-relations/

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

Glossary of Media Interview Terms – from Los Angeles Media Trainer Lisa Elia

Glossary of Media Interview Terms – from Los Angeles Media Trainer Lisa Elia

 

Media training is meant to help anyone who is going to be interviewed by the media to feel as prepared as possible.

Understanding the lingo that you may encounter before or during interviews will help you to feel more at ease.

 

This glossary of media interview terms will get you started.

a-roll – This is the footage shot by the primary camera, in shoots with more than one camera.

attribution – Attributing the source of information to its originator. If you provide information or quotes that are not your own, be sure to mention the source. If you do not, you risk being accused of plagiarism, which is illegal and damaging to your reputation.

b-roll – This is background footage that is generally shown to accompany voice-over provided by a news reporter or the audio of an interview. Sometimes TV news crews will shoot b-roll, and sometimes the producer will ask interviewees or their PR representatives to supply b-roll. It is beneficial to have b-roll available if you have something that could add visual interest to a news story, such as footage of your product being manufactured, or a tour of your facility. For people in the entertainment industry, interviewers might expect you to bring clips of films or TV shows that are being promoted: the studios will generally provide these.

boom (microphone) – This is the large microphone that is generally at the end of a boom pole and held near the action, to capture sound.

Chyron (pronounced ˈkīrän) – The graphics or words that appear at the bottom of a TV screen. The Chyron Corporation created the on-air graphics that became popular, and subsequently, the name “Chyron” has become used generically. In some countries, this is referred to as a “name super” or “cap gen” or “CG”.

crawl – This is the text that “crawls” along the bottom of a TV screen during an interview or news segment. Sometimes this text is unrelated to what is on screen.

lapel mic/lavalier mic/personal mic – For many TV interviews, a lapel mic or lavalier mic will be clipped onto your clothing, with the “mic pack” clipped to your clothing, somewhere where it will not be seen, such as the back of your belt, or even inside a dress or shirt. Consider this when choosing your clothing for an interview.

mic pack – This is the electronic pack that transfers the signal from a lapel mic to the camera or soundboard.

off the record –I advise clients not to say anything that you do not want to see in the news. With social media acting as an amplifier of any message, this is a good rule to follow in most areas of your life (except to your very inner circle).

press kit – Those of you who are reading this who work with publicists or an in-house PR team probably already have had a professional press kit developed for you. This phrase is included in this glossary because many people casually interchange “press kit” and “sales kit,” but they are not the same things. When members of the media request your press kit, they do not want your sales materials. They want to see your factual press kit materials. A press kit generally includes the background information that members of the media may need to produce articles or stories on you, including a biography, a company backgrounder, information on your products and services, key press clips, and references to relevant facts and studies.

remote (interview) – A remote interview is when the interviewer is in a different location than the interviewee. Remote interviews can occur via Skype or other videoconferencing software applications and systems, or you may be asked to go to a studio to shoot a remote interview with an interviewer that is located elsewhere. Or, a remote interview may be shot at some other location. This is sometimes called a “live shot”.

still (photograph) – Stills are simply photographs, as in “still images”, as opposed to “moving images”. Print media outlets will often ask for still photographs that can support the story being written, but radio and TV producers might also ask for stills to be used in producing their stories. Radio stations now have active and very visually appealing websites, so good visuals are now necessary to support some radio interviews as well as print and TV interviews.

talking points From the perspective of many members of the media, the talking points that they may ask you or your representatives to send to them are discussion points or topics that you will discuss in a media interview. You might also have a separate list of talking points that are the discussion points you want to incorporate into your answers.

Media training entails much more than understanding media interview terms.

To excel in media interviews, you must be prepared on many levels that go far beyond media interview terms. Good media training should address the strategy behind the interviews, and prepare you physically, mentally and emotionally.

For more media training tips, visit these links on our site:

Frequently Asked Questions about Media Training
https://expertmediatraining.com/faqs-about-media-training/

Media Training Tips for Actors, Music Artists and Performers
https://expertmediatraining.com/media-training-for-actors-music-artists-and-performers-media-interview-tips/

Media Interview Checklist from a Los Angeles Media Trainer
https://expertmediatraining.com/media-interview-checklist-from-a-media-trainer/

Body Language in Interviews and Meetings – Nonverbal Communication
https://expertmediatraining.com/body-language-in-interviews-and-meetings/

How to Create an Online Press Room That the Media Will Love
https://expertmediatraining.com/online-press-room-tips-from-media-trainer/

Prepare for TV Interviews BEFORE You Book One – Tips from an LA Media Trainer and Spokesperson
https://expertmediatraining.com/prepare-for-tv-interviews-media-trainer-tips/

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

To arrange a free consultation, call us at 310-479-0217. Or, you can email us at team@expertmediatraining.com

How to Create an Online Press Room That the Media Will Love, from a Los Angeles Media Trainer

How to Create an Online Press Room, blog post by Media Trainer Lisa EliaMost people who are in business or who are experts, authors or entertainers, would love to be featured in, or on, major media outlets, not only so they can spread their messages to millions of people quickly, but because large media outlets have a trusted following. Being seen on Oprah or CNN, or being featured in Inc. or Bloomberg Businessweek, gives you instant credibility among their audiences. This “third-party endorsement” from the trusted editors, writers and producers at the media outlets goes a long way in building their audiences’ trust in you!

If you want to see your face on TV, or your products or words of wisdom in magazines, you need to know how to present your information the way the media want to see it. The first place most media members go to check you out, is your website. Then, they will immediately look for an “online press room”.

An online press room is, in the eyes of the media, the place on your website where they will find what they need to know to determine whether or not they want to do a story on you or to interview you. It’s also the place they might go back to in order to produce an article or segment on you. They want all the information in one place and, preferably, to see the various components at a glance.

Journalists, bloggers and TV and radio producers are very busy, especially now that many of the media outlets have reduced their staff, so the more you can supply them with the information they need at the click of a mouse, the more they will want to work with you.

Following is a list of items to include in an online press room.

If you don’t have them all, just begin with the elements you do have, and continue to add components as you develop them.

• In your online press room, post the words “Media contact” followed by the name, email address and phone number of the person who will handle calls and inquiries from the media on your behalf. It’s okay if it’s you.

o Do not skip the phone number or email address here. Members of the media do not like to fill out online forms, and they frequently need to reach potential guests quickly. If they can’t call you, they may move on to someone who is more accessible.

• Include your biography and/or company backgrounder in your online press room.

o If you are an expert, you might only have a biography. If you have a company that exists beyond yourself, you might also have a company backgrounder.

• Your video reel or videos of you speaking should be near the top of your online press room page.

o If you have not yet been interviewed on TV, you can include other video of yourself speaking, to give the media an idea of how you come across. Be sure the quality is good and that you are talking about topics that are relevant to the way you are positioning yourself.

o If you don’t have any videos yet and you have not obtained any prior media training, a few media training sessions with a seasoned media trainer will boost your clarity, confidence and poise on camera. Just a couple of media training sessions can help you to capture the attention of television producers with your videos. For more information on our media training services, visit https://expertmediatraining.com/services-media-training-and-presentation-training/.

o For experts or people who want to do a lot of demonstrations in the media, include video segments of you providing tips or information or doing demonstrations. If you can make these segments downloadable from your online press room for news producers to capture and include in news segments, you’ll have an even greater advantage over your competition. To see examples of the types of videos you should include in your online press room, visit https://expertmediatraining.com/press-room-for-la-media-trainer-lisa-elia/.

o Be sure your video content is viewable on your website and in your online press room: don’t use links that will lead people away from your site and onto YouTube, Vimeo, or elsewhere. If your videos are hosted on YouTube or Vimeo, you can create a playlist and embed it onto your website. This would allow members of the media to watch several videos of you, within one small frame on your page. I use Vimeo Plus, so that I can have my videos on my site, without the Vimeo logo and without other people’s videos being shown following mine, as YouTube videos often do.

• An audio reel or links to audio interviews can also be included in your online press room.

o If you have not yet been interviewed on the radio, but decide to include other audio recordings, such as those from teleseminars, only include top-quality content. You may want to edit it to capture only the best parts of each teleseminar.

• In your online press room, post a list of topics you can discuss, and story or segment ideas.

o Conduct some research to determine what has already been covered extensively in the media, and then think of some topics that are compelling.

o To get a sense of how to write your list of topics, look at covers of magazines and other print media, and pay attention to the way guests are announced on the TV and radio shows where you would like to be featured.

o One of the topics or segment ideas on your list may be the very reason a member of the media decides to create a TV segment or article featuring you.

• Include press releases, press clippings and articles you have authored in your online press room.

o Although there’s no rule about any of this, one way to include press clips is to post the covers of the media outlets where you have received coverage with hotlinks that lead to PDFs of each clipping. People generally want to read the articles themselves.

o If you include links to the media outlets’ sites, check them frequently: many media outlets regularly move content on their sites.

• Create interesting fact sheets for your online press room.

o To increase your chances of gaining press coverage, include a fact sheet(s) in your online press room that includes background information on topics related to your area of expertise, relevant facts and statistics from universities and research institutes, and professional associations. For example, if you are a fitness expert, include fact sheets with statistics on the number of people who are obese, how many pounds the average person gains during the holidays, the efficacy of certain types of exercise, and so on.

o Be sure to use reputable sources, such as top universities or institutions, for the data you include in your fact sheets, and be sure to credit all sources. It is good to include a link to the source of the information, so a member of the press who wants to quickly verify it can do so.

Expert Media Training™ blog post on how to create an online press room that the media will love, by Los Angeles Media Trainer and PR Expert Lisa Elia - camera lens in photo.• Include a small photo gallery in your online press room, including a few downloadable photos of yourself, and any products you have created.

o The most preferred photo format by the media is jpeg, generally 300 DPI (dots per inch).

o The types of photos to include are headshots that could run with articles about you or your company, images of each of your products, and images of your staff and facility, if you have a larger company.

o If your work includes creating transformations of any kind, whether you transform environments or people, include before-and-after images in your downloadable photo gallery. Just make sure you have the right to publish all the photos you use.

• If you sell or create products, include product line sheets in your online press room, in the form of downloadable PDFs.

• If you offer a variety of services, you may want to include a list of services that you provide, or simply post in your online press room a link that opens your “services” page as a new window. You want this to open in a new window so you keep the members of the media in your press room.

• Authors should include a book one-sheet in their online press rooms.

o This document usually contains a one- to two-paragraph description of your book with bullet points of main topics covered in the book, top reviews for the book, a photo of the book cover, a photo of yourself and a brief paragraph about you (approximately one or two paragraphs). Include the publishing information, ISBN number, price, publishing date and stores or sites where the book is available.

• Testimonials can be included in your online press room, but be sure to only include those that don’t sound too salesy.

o You can have a separate page containing testimonials from clients/customers or incorporate them into other documents within your online press room. Or, you can include a link to the testimonials page, on your online press room page.

Once you know exactly which elements you will include in your online press room, give some thought and planning to the layout of the page.

Name your online press room something obvious, like “Press Room” or “Media”. Include your online press room page link in your main navigation bar on your website. Don’t make people search for it under “About Us” or elsewhere.

Put the most important elements above the fold, including your “media contact” information, video of you, a photo of you, and at least a few sentences of your biography. For those who don’t know what “above the fold” means, it’s an expression that refers to a folded newspaper: the most important news was usually placed “above the fold”. On a web page, “above the fold” generally refers to whatever is visible before someone scrolls down.

One way to show many elements on your page, at a glance, is to post the first paragraph of text and then include a “read more” link that opens a page or document with the remainder of the content.

Before you make your online press room live, be sure to use SpellCheck and have someone else review your online press room to ensure that it doesn’t contain any mistakes. Many members of the media are writers with eagle eyes for errors: sometimes one typo could blow your credibility, in their eyes.

The more you present yourself and your offerings in a professional, organized, accessible manner, the more likely you will be to capture the attention of the media and to keep them coming back to you.

To see an example of an online press room from a PR expert and media trainer, visit mine at https://expertmediatraining.com/press-room-for-la-media-trainer-lisa-elia/

Good luck with your online press room!

Here are more links that you may find helpful.

For a Media Interview Checklist to keep on hand, click here.

This Glossary of Media Interview Terms will also be useful: https://expertmediatraining.com/media-interview-terms-from-los-angeles-media-trainer/

To read How to Create an Online Press Room That the Media Will Love, click here.

Prepare for TV Interviews BEFORE You Book One. Click here to read this post.

Lisa Elia

Los Angeles Media Trainer Lisa Elia is the founder of Expert Media Training™, a Los Angeles media training and presentation training firm that serves clients worldwide.

Social Media Tips to Create Relationships with the Press

Do you need social media tips that will help you to create relationships with the press?

Social media tips to create relationships with the press post by Los Angeles Media Trainer Lisa Elia, of Expert Media Training™, serving Los Angeles and clients worldwide

Use these social media tips, from a PR Expert and Media Trainer, to get on the press’ radar.

If there are certain bloggers or media personalities who you think would be interested in you, your company, products or services, search for them and follow them on social networking sites, such as LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. Members of the media sometimes post queries on social media sites, or they may see what you are working on and contact you to interview you.

Here are a few social media tips that can help you to get started:

You can follow specific writers, producers and departments of your favorite media outlets like The New York Times Health Section, Fortune Magazine, Today Show 4th-hour hosts Kathie L. Gifford and Hoda Kotb. Make them aware of you by commenting on, or sharing, their articles, tips or segments. Be sure to the outlets or content creators so they see that you shared their content. If you add an insightful comment, this can help capture their attention, too.

One of our favorite tools to find people and companies on Twitter is Twellow. It’s free and it’s like the Twitter Yellow Pages. You can enter in keywords that you think the people you’re searching for would use in their profiles, such as “health writer” or “fashion producer”.

Once you’ve used these social media tips to follow your targeted writers and producers and media outlets, DO NOT pitch them through social media or post promotional materials or pitches on their walls. There’s not much that screams, “I don’t understand how social media or any media works,” more than a post that reads, “Hey, Oprah. Want to interview us?” (Just don’t do it.)

Members of the media generally prefer to be pitched through email (and occasionally by phone). What you can do to get on the radar of media producers and editors is to share great posts and links to stories on your Facebook wall or Twitter feed and comment positively on their stories, being sure to them.

On Twitter, be sure to use hashtags that pertain to your area of expertise and topics you can discuss. Members of the media often use hashtags to search for people to interview.

You may want to take a look back at your profiles on all social media sites to see how members of the media would find you and what their opinion of you may be, based on your profile. If one of your profiles doesn’t represent the brand or image you want to convey, now’s the time to update them.

Using these social media tips can lead to press bookings. Just make sure you are properly prepared for the interviews. This is where media training and presentation training can help.

Now that you have the social media tips you need, do you need tips on engaging the media with video or on creating an online press room that the media will love?

Read the blog posts below.

Video Engagement Tips from a Media Trainer and PR Expert:

https://expertmediatraining.com/video-engagement-tips-from-media-trainer/

How to Create an Online Press Room That the Media Will Love, from a Los Angeles Media Trainer

https://expertmediatraining.com/online-press-room-tips-from-media-trainer/

If you want to share these social media tips with your friends, you can do so by using the share buttons below.

I hope these social media tips help you to create relationships with the press that lead to great TV, radio or print features for you and/or your business.

 

 

Learn What the Media Want, a Video Interview with a Media Member from a Media Trainer

One of the most interesting things I’ve had the pleasure of doing is to interview members of the media about what they seek in guests to interview and what they think potential guests and interviewees should do to get featured in large media outlets.

The video below is from an interview I conducted at my Meet the Media Day event, with Nicole Dorsey Straff, who had been on the launch team as managing editor of Fit Magazine, spent years as Fitness magazine’s west coast editor, and is now at ValueClick Brands. In this video, Nicole touches on what the media want, how to get featured in large media outlets, and more.

Watch the video below to learn what the media want and to learn how to get featured in large media outlets.

If you want to share what the media want with your friends, you can do so by using the share buttons below.

If you want additional tips on how to get featured in large media outlets and information about what the media want, read some of the other blog posts by Los Angeles Media Trainer Lisa Elia:

Top 10 Media Relations Tips – Media Training Tips from a Media Trainer

https://expertmediatraining.com/media-training-tips-for-good-media-relations/

Media Interview Checklist

https://expertmediatraining.com/media-interview-checklist-from-a-media-trainer/

How to Create an Online Press Room that the Media Will Love

https://expertmediatraining.com/online-press-room-tips-from-media-trainer/

 

Video Engagement Tips from a Media Trainer and PR Expert

Use video to engage the media post by Los Angeles Media Trainer Lisa Elia, of Expert Media Training™, serving Los Angeles and clients worldwide

Use these video engagement tips to capture the attention of the media.

Videos are extremely important because members of the media (especially TV producers) need to see how you will come across on camera before they will book you for an interview. Increasingly, print media outlets are now including videos on their websites, to correlate to their print articles. Members of the media frequently search YouTube and Google for experts to interview and products to feature. So, if you want to attract the media and keep them interested in you or your company, video is crucial.

Here are a few video engagement tips to get you started:

If you are an expert, create videos of yourself sharing valuable tips or information, or demonstrating what you do. If you create products, you can also share tips, but be sure to create at least one video that shows the products in use. Be sure that the lighting, audio and video quality is adequate for the media. You can lose the attention of the media quickly if your videos look too unprofessional or if they are difficult to watch.

Host your videos on your website so that you lead people back to your site to view them. For purposes of media pitching, it’s best to host at least a few of your videos in an online press room on your website. You can also post your videos in the videos section of your Facebook page and other social media accounts, and share them in your feeds.

Include links to videos in the body of your press releases so that when they are published, readers can view the videos to gain information, be entertained or see something else that is useful, educational and/or entertaining. Also include links to videos of you/your products in your email pitches to the media so they can get an immediate sense of you and/or your products.

Be sure your videos represent you well. This is where media training and presentation training can help.

Now that you have the video engagement tips you need, do you need additional resources on media training and capturing the attention of the media?

Here are some that you can access on our site.

Videos with Tips to Improve Communication, Presentations, Speeches and Media Interviews:
https://expertmediatraining.com/videos-media-interviews-presentations-speeches-investor-pitches

Media Training Resources:
https://expertmediatraining.com/media-training-resources/

Frequently Asked Questions about Media Training
https://expertmediatraining.com/faqs-about-media-training/

If you want to share these video engagement tips on social media, you can do so by using the share buttons below.

I hope these video engagement tips help you to create amazing videos that capture the attention of the media.

 

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How to Become a Contributing Writer or Editor, from PR Expert and Media Trainer Lisa Elia

Being a contributing writer or editor for a major media outlet, like The Huffington Post or Forbes.com, can do a lot to increase your visibility and to establish you as a thought leader. While thousands of people submit themselves for these positions, there are some things you can do to stack the odds of being accepted in your favor.

How to Become a Contributing Writer or Editor from PR Expert and Media Trainer Lisa Elia

How to become a contributing writer or editor:

1. Be sure to carefully read the submission guidelines, which are usually listed on the media outlet or blog’s website. If you can’t find the guidelines, go to the About Us or Contact Us or FAQs page, and you will probably find them there.

2. Before you submit your information, be sure that the written materials that you have online — on your blog, your website and your social media profiles — represents you well, both in terms of content and writing style.

3. If you need to go back and edit some of your posts to correct typos or grammatical or punctuation errors, do so. Remove anything that detracts from your presentation as a professional writer.

4. Think about what you have to add to the specific outlet for which you want to write.

5. Create a list of topics you can write about and an overarching subject theme.

6. If you have the opportunity to submit a complete blog post, rather than just ideas, do so. It will make it easier for the decision makers to decide whether or not you’re the right fit for the outlet.

7. In the brief bio that you submit, be sure to include what’s most impressive about you, such as your education, impressive clients with whom you have worked, previous press coverage in major media outlets, compelling results that you have achieved or helped others achieve, and other honors and accomplishments.

The online submission process can make becoming a contributing writer seem quick and easy, but some planning and forethought will ensure you have the best shot at getting a “yes!”

I’d love to hear how you do, so keep in touch!

Now that you have tips on how to become a contributing writer, do you need additional tips on media relations? Check out these links:

Know Your Facts to Book More Interviews – Media Training Tips

How to Be a Great Interviewer or Moderator – Tips from a Media Trainer and Moderator Who’s Been There

Glossary of Media Interview Terms – from Los Angeles Media Trainer Lisa Elia

I’m Just a… And Other Undermining Statements to Avoid – Communication Tips from a Media Trainer

 

Should You Write a Letter to the Editor? Advice from a PR Expert and Media Trainer

Letters to the editor: should you or shouldn't you? From PR Expert and Media Trainer Lisa Elia

Are you asking yourself, “should I write a letter to the editor?”

If you want to be seen as a thought leader, one good way to gain visibility is to write a letter to the editor of a newspaper or other print media outlets, in the hopes of it being published, of course.

Letters to the editor are generally meant to be in response to something that a media outlet has published.

People write letters to the editor in order to express opinions in support of, or in opposition to, an article that was published in the editor’s media outlet. Some people write letters to the editor to expand upon information that was shared within an article that the outlet published.

Here are some considerations to help you determine whether or not writing a letter to the editor is a good strategy for you:

Who are the readers of the publication? Are they members of your target audience?

Is the publication prestigious? If so, even if the readers are not in your target audience, a published letter to the editor could be something impressive to add to your press kit and website.

Do you feel strongly about something that was published in the media outlet? If you have a strong opinion, writing about it will be much easier than if you’re solely out to get published.

Do you have expertise or experience that relates to the topic in the article about which you plan to write the letter? If so, establish your credibility by sharing a concise summary of your background. If you hold degrees or certifications or if you have a significant amount of experience in a field that relates to the topic, be sure to emphasize this. This can greatly increase your chances of having your letter published.

Would you be able to handle negative comments or criticism in response to your letter, if it is published? Opinions are like noses: everyone has one. If you want to share yours, know that others may disagree, and they may not always be polite about it.

As with any strategy, consider your resources of time and energy and the potential return on investment of your time and energy.

If you enjoyed this post on writing a letter to the editor, you may also enjoy these blog posts:

How to Communicate with Maturity, Tips from a Media Trainer and Communication Expert

How to Avoid Using Jargon in Media Interviews and Communications – Tips from a Media Trainer

I’m Just a… And Other Undermining Statements to Avoid – Communication Tips from a Media Trainer

Authenticity and Your Message – a Note from a Media Trainer

 

Humor, Hubris and Hiccups, a Los Angeles Media Trainer’s Thoughts on Wording

Humor, Hubris and Hiccups - blog post on wording by Media Trainer Lisa Elia

In an age where photos and graphics are used to tell stories, it’s interesting how words, and wording, are no less important than they were in the past.

Consider how a quote can make its way around the Internet, crossing time zones and continents.

Make it funny and people can’t wait to share it.

Your voice as a writer and speaker emerges and continues to develop over time.

What you choose NOT to say is just as informative of your brand as what you do say.

Is complaining part of your brand?

Is talking about how tired you are part of your brand?

Probably not.

The way you present yourself to others and the way you treat others, with your pen and your presence, shapes your brand.

Do you think people seem smarter when they’re putting down others?

Do you love it when you read something that shows someone has passed from confidence to arrogance?

Probably not.

If your words are not perfectly composed, do you want people to pin you to a wall for it?

When you’re speaking in public, do you want people to laugh if you stumble?

Probably not.

It makes it easy to know what others want when you look at things this way.

This is what it comes down to:

Humor is welcomed by most, understood by some, and disdained by few.

Hubris is disdained by most, understood by all, and welcomed by few.

Hiccups happen–figuratively in our writing, or literally, when we’re speaking. We’re not always going to be perfect. How you handle hiccups is what matters.

Go back to the humor, perhaps.

As you become more publicly known, you can still be yourself, but show the world the best version of yourself.

Want additional tips, thoughts and advice on wording? Check out these blog posts:

I’m Just a… And Other Undermining Statements to Avoid – Communication Tips from a Media Trainer

How to Avoid Using Jargon in Media Interviews and Communications – Tips from a Media Trainer

Authenticity and Your Message – a Note from a Media Trainer

Glossary of Media Interview Terms – from Los Angeles Media Trainer Lisa Elia

 

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