How to Be Effective in Video Meetings and Presentations: Adjusting Your Communication Style

How to Be Effective in Video Meetings and Presentations: Adjusting Your Communication Style

How to Be Effective in Video Meetings and Presentations: Adjusting Your Communication Style

Adjusting Your Communication Style for Virtual Meetings and Presentations by Presentation Trainer Lisa Elia of Expert Media TrainingVideo conferencing can be an extremely effective way to hold meetings and deliver presentations. People tend to try to focus solely on the meeting and ignore distractions because their face is zoomed in on, they are probably less likely to be looking at other devices or whispering to someone next to them.

With this increased focus on one another and with the variation in the quality of each individual’s Internet connection and equipment, there are some shifts you can make to ensure your video calls and meetings run smoothly and effectively and that you deliver confidently and with polish.

Before Your Begin, Prepare Yourself Mentally.

It’s important to clear your head, get focused, and manage nervousness before meetings, interviews, and presentations so that you can be at your best. I put my clients through a series of brief exercises to help them do this and to warm up their bodies and vocal cords. For now, use some of the techniques you might already use that will help you achieve a state of being energized and at ease, such as diaphragmatic breathing, listening to music, and exercising to relieve stress and sharpen your mind.

Greet People Warmly with a Smile.

Adjusting Your Communication Style for Virtual Meetings and Presentations by Presentation Trainer Lisa Elia of Expert Media TrainingSomehow, most people look much more serious on video than in person. Greet people warmly with a smile at the start of the video meeting or presentation just as you would if you were welcoming them into your home.

How much or how often you smile during a meeting will depend on the content and tone of the meeting. Aim to maintain a pleasant resting face.

Don’t Show Shock or Awe Over What You See.

You will see someone’s home or office, which may be messy, cluttered, or more luxurious than you might expect. Someone may attend a meeting having made questionable wardrobe choices. Try to not show surprise, shock or awe over what you see as this could make them uncomfortable. A nice, simple compliment is fine, if appropriate.

Maintain Eye Contact and Avoid Looking Away Too Often.

If you have placed your webcam at eye level or slightly above, you should be able to look at the people you are talking to on your computer monitor and it will seem as if you are looking into their eyes. When in an in-person meeting, it’s normal to look away periodically to gather your thoughts. It’s okay to do this a little bit on video calls, but if you do it too abruptly or too often, people might wonder what you’re looking at and they may think you’re distracted by something that’s going on around you.

If you will need to look at another device or take notes, tell participants on the video call that you will be doing so, so they know why you are looking down or away periodically.

Listen Attentively.

The added challenge of voices being transmitted electronically and potential feedback means you should listen more closely than usual.

Pause More Often Than You Would in Person, Especially on Group Calls.

How to Be Effective in Video Meetings and Presentations: Adjusting Your Communication StyleSince there can be delays in video and sound transmission on video calls, pausing a bit more than usual will give people time to assimilate your message and to respond. Pausing periodically is especially important on group calls where different people may want to speak.

Zoom and other videoconferencing tools have features that allow people to “raise their hands” to indicate to the host that they want to speak, but with smaller groups, especially those with high-powered individuals, they may not want to “raise their hands”.

You May Need to Enunciate More and Slow Down a Bit.

If you tend to speak quickly or run your words together, you may need to enunciate more and slow down a bit to be understood well on video calls. This is something to practice daily. Elevating your communication habits in all situations will prepare you to be a better communicator when participating in video meetings and presentations.

End Your Video Call Clearly and Smoothly.

When the video call is coming to an end, clarify the next steps to be taken, allow everyone to say their thank-yous and goodbyes and then, if you are the host, click to end the meeting quickly. Know where this function is located on your screen so you’re not caught on video fumbling and searching for it.

Be Sure Your Communication and Presentation Skills are Up to Speed.

Whether you are communicating through video, by phone, or in person, the ability to communicate clearly, confidently, and with authority over your topic or material is what’s needed to succeed.

This is part 2 of our series of blog posts to provide tips on how to communicate more effectively when using video platforms. To read part 1 of this blog series, How to Be Effective in Video Meetings and Presentations: Preparing Your Set-up, Your Environment, and Yourself, click here.

To discuss presentation training, media training, investor pitch coaching, or video communication skills training, contact us at 310-479-0217.

Or, email us at [email protected]

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

How to Be Effective in Video Meetings and Presentations: Preparing Your Set-up, Your Environment, and Yourself

How to Be Effective in Video Meetings and Presentations: Preparing Your Set-up, Your Environment, and Yourself

With more people than ever conducting business from home, the use of video to hold meetings, media interviews, sales presentations, and investor pitches is becoming the norm. Even after social distancing measures are lifted, many business leaders are predicting that the use of video conferencing will replace many in-person meetings going forward for reasons of health, cost-savings, and efficiency.

This is part 1 of our series of blog posts to provide tips on not only how to set up your environment, but also the shifts you need to make to communicate effectively in video meetings and presentations.

To read part 2 of this blog series, How to Be Effective in Video Meetings and Presentations: Adjusting Your Communication Style, click here.

How to Hold Effective Video Meetings and Presentations: Preparing Your Set-up, Your Environment, and Yourself

Prepare Your Set-up and Your Environment.

How to Hold Effective Video Meetings and Presentations: Preparing Your Set-up, Environment and YourselfWith video calls, it’s as if you are inviting someone (or a group of people) into your office, so it’s important to create a good experience for them.

Create a space where you can hold video calls. If you can keep it ready to go with little last-minute modification needed, you can save time and minimize stress. Here are some tips.

Consider your background.

Make sure your background is as free of distractions as possible. Log onto your video conference software or video yourself to see what might cause a distraction in your background. Family photos, artwork or even a stray paper or two can steal focus from you. Books and simple artifacts on a shelf can make for a good backdrop You may decide to set up your video conference/recording area in another part of your home or against a different wall.

Replace your background, if necessary, using green-screen technology.

Zoom video conferencing software, which is what many people are using now, allows you to upload photo and video backgrounds or choose one that is provided. (If you use Zoom, please use a password to protect yourself against Zoombombers, which are hackers that burst into your Zoom meeting.)

Some webcams also allow you to replace your background. These technologies work best with a green screen behind you. You can purchase a collapsible green screen. The ones with the pneumatic frames are especially easy to open and close. Rather than purchasing a green screen, you could paint a wall or large piece of cardboard with chroma key green paint or purchase green-screen wallpaper or wall decals. The brand of green screen that I have seems to be temporarily sold out, but this is a similar one.

Remove distracting items that will be in view on your desk.

Remove distracting photos, knickknacks, and food from the customer’s view. If you have a beverage, be sure the cup or glass you use is something you would use in a professional setting.

Raise your computer.

Place your computer on a stack of books or a box so you’re looking at it at eye level or slightly higher. Avoid having to look down at your computer which will distort your face and can create neck and back problems. If you have an adjustable desk or standing desk, you can use that to hold your computer. If you have an external webcam, place it on top of your computer and adjust the height of your computer so your webcam is at eye level or slightly higher.

Upgrade your equipment, if necessary.

Webcam – A good external webcam can improve the quality of your video transmission through higher resolution, speed, and fluidity. I use this Logitech C922x Pro Stream Webcam.

Microphone – Poor sound quality on a video call can lead participants to strain to hear, which can lead to frustration and negative opinions and emotions. A good external microphone can be worth the investment. Depending on the sensitivity of your external microphone, place it approximately 4 to 10 inches from your mouth. I sit approximately 5 inches from my Blue Yeti microphone.

Light your face.

Place soft lights behind your computer screen or webcam with the light reflecting on your face, if possible. If you want to up your video game, you can purchase one of the many “ring lights” that are available. Some of them allow you to adjust the tone of the light and they sit on an adjustable tripod so you can raise and lower the light. I recently purchased this light and find it very easy to use.

Test your equipment and set-up.

Create a video or hold a practice video conference with a friend or family member to test your equipment and set-up. If you are able, record the video conference, as Zoom allows you to do. Then, see if there are adjustments you need to make.

 

Prepare Yourself.

How to Be Effective in Video Meetings and Presentations: Preparing Your Set-up, Environment and YourselfDuring in-person meetings, people’s eyes may stray and they may not look directly at you as much as when you’re communicating via video. This is why it’s important to pay extra attention to your personal appearance.

Dress for your meeting.

If you are in sales or making an investor pitch, dress the way you would for an in-person meeting. If you work in an environment where casual dress is the norm, dress accordingly.

Know that you may need to stand up at some point during your video call, for some unforeseen reason, so avoid wearing pajama bottoms or making other clothing choices you will regret.

Avoid wearing noisy jewelry.

This is a good rule any time you will be on camera.

Wear clothing that is not too distracting.

A great pattern that would look fantastic in person can be distracting when you’re viewed on video. Beware of very low necklines or anything that might result in a wardrobe malfunction.

If you wear make-up regularly, you might want to apply a little more.

For people who wear make-up consider adding a bit more or brightening it up a bit for your video calls and meetings. The camera tends to wash people out. If you’re not used to wearing make-up, you may still want some face powder that matches your skin tone to control shine.

Test your appearance and outfit by taking a quick video of yourself moving around before meetings or shooting videos.

Once you know what works and doesn’t work on camera, you can plan your wardrobe accordingly for upcoming videos and virtual meetings.

Request that others around you are quiet and refrain from interrupting you.

This can be a challenge if you have small children or pets but do your best. If possible, have someone watch over them and keep them in a separate room while you are on video calls. If you are interrupted, ask the people on the video call or meeting for a moment to handle the situation, which would be better than trying to shout over a barking dog or noisy child.

Set aside time to prepare mentally for your meeting, presentation or video.

How to Hold Effective Video Meetings and Presentations: Preparing Your Set-up, Environment and YourselfWhen working with my clients, I teach them a preparation ritual to help them manage nervousness and focus their minds before presentations, media interviews, and other high-stakes situations. Shifting your energy and preparing to be fully present for your meeting or presentation can help you to perform better and will make a vast difference in the way you feel and are perceived.

To read part 2 of this blog series, How to Hold Effective Video Meetings and Presentations: Adjusting Your Communication Style, click here.

To discuss presentation training, media training, investor pitch coaching, or video communication skills training, contact us at 310-479-0217.

Or, email us at [email protected]

Disclosure: Please note that purchasing items through the links provided may result in commissions to me, at no additional cost to you. These links were shared to answer the inevitable “What would you use?” questions. Please only purchase items that you believe will be beneficial to you.

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

How to Deliver Dry Information with Style – A Lesson from Spirit Airlines

How to Deliver Dry Information with Style – A Lesson from Spirit Airlines

On a recent trip to Denver, my husband and I flew Spirit Airlines. If you’re not familiar with Spirit Airlines, imagine the most basic, no-frills, charge-you-for-everything airline you can fathom. That’s Spirit. Apparently, even a seat-back pocket to stow your goods while you fly is too much to ask, so there are a few bungee cords crisscrossed across the back of the seat in front of you to hold whatever is large enough to not fall through the giant empty spaces it leaves. The experience is so spartan that it’s actually kind of funny, and a sense of humor goes a long way when you’re known as one of the cheapest airlines around, as we were about to find out.

The pre-flight safety speech started out on an unusual high note when the friendly-sounding airline attendant said, “For those of you who swore you would never fly Spirit again, welcome back.” We could relate to that. After flying Spirit last year, I told my husband we should never fly it again, but when it turned out that a Spirit flight was our best option for the short 2-hour flight to Denver, we decided I would be okay. Clearly, we were not alone in our decision-reversal.

When the airline attendant peppered her safety speech with humor, even saying something to the effect of, “After you’ve adjusted your life jacket, check your hair and make-up, and safely exit the plane.”

I had a quick chat with the woman who delivered this fresh, funny safety speech. It was so well constructed that I thought it was written for her. She told me that she had written it herself and she had been tweaking it over time.

You can use some of the techniques that the airline attendant incorporated into her humorous, yet informative, safety speech. She…

  • added the element of surprise (e.g., making fun of Spirit’s austere approach to service);
  • lightened the heaviness of potentially dire warnings with frivolous details/recommendations (e.g., checking your hair and make-up before grabbing your flotation device);
  • and used a happy, bouncy tone, even when talking about serious topics (This worked because she began her speech with humor, setting the tone for the entire talk.).

Use your best judgement when incorporating humor into speeches. Avoid emotionally loaded references. If you’re not sure if your use of humor is appropriate, run it by a few people. Record yourself delivering the speech and then listen to it as if you’re someone else. Continue to modify it until you’ve achieved the balance of enough humor to keep people’s attention and enough solid information to effectively convey your message.

If you’re interested in improving your presentation skills, you can arrange a complimentary discovery call with Lisa Elia by calling our office at 310-479-0217 or emailing us at [email protected]

In the meantime, here are some other articles to read:

6 Tips to Make Effective Presentations

Memorizing Speeches and Interview Responses Can Cause Detachment

Six Essentials to Make Your Business Appealing to Media and Customers

 

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

6 Tips for Effective Presentations

6 Tips for Effective Presentations

If you will be making important investor presentations, sales presentations and/or public speeches, and you want to come across powerfully, effectively and naturally, you must know how to prepare for presentations.

Here are a few of my presentation tips:

1. Always think about what’s in it for them (WIIFT), no matter whom you are addressing.

2. Avoid oversharing. Think about what people really need to know about you or your company.

3. Remember the five Cs. When you are making a presentation, whether you are trying to raise money, make a sale or you are in a media interview, the five Cs are important:

• Credible: People want to be sure you know what you are talking about and that you have the credentials to present the information you are delivering.

• Confident: People want to see someone who is confident. They will trust you more if you appear confident in everything that you do.

• Clear: Explain everything as clearly as you can and be…

• Concise: Be as succinct as you can.

• Compelling: No one wants to be bored.

4. Imagine how the most successful, qualified person in your field would present the information you are about to present, and model yourself after the image you create.

5. Anticipate peoples’ needs and include the answers to their potential objections or questions in your presentation.

6. Prepare and rehearse answers to tough questions and commonly asked questions so that nothing can throw you off during your presentation.

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

Expert Media Training – Blog Among Top-Ranking Public Speaking Blogs

Expert Media Training – Blog Among Top-Ranking Public Speaking Blogs

I am honored that my blog has been named one of the top 50 public speaking blogs by Feedspot. Of the thousands of public speaking blogs, Feedspot ranked ours as number 30. I am grateful to be in good company among my respected peers.

“These blogs are ranked based on following criteria:

  • Google reputation and Google search ranking
  • Influence and popularity on Facebook, twitter and other social media sites
  • Quality and consistency of posts
  • Feedspot’s editorial team and expert review”

To read more of the blogs on Feedspot’s site, click here.

I strive to provide content that is relevant to my readers. I welcome requests to cover specific topics within the arenas of public speaking, presentations, media interviews and investor pitching.

Please email topic requests to my team and me at [email protected].

Lisa Elia, Founder of Expert Media Training™

 

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

Five Tips to Make the Most of Media Interviews, Presentations and Panels

Five Tips to Make the Most of Media Interviews, Presentations and Panels

 1. Know what drives your audience at any given time; pain avoidance or aspiration.

Some people are more motivated to avoid pain, thus the “speak to their pain points” advice that has proliferated on the Internet for the past decade. Others are more motivated by their aspirations or ideals. Most people’s motivations can vacillate between pain avoidance and aspiration, depending on the matter at hand.

When preparing for media interviews, presentations and panel discussions, consider which form of motivation is strongest for your audience in relation to the topic you are discussing and shape your messages accordingly.

2. Pay attention to the fringes.

Many people focus only on their primary target market and they often ignore or overlook smaller market segments and key influencers. (Key influencers are the people who influence your target audience’s decision-making process and can include business advisors in other fields, managers, agents, assistants and spouses, among others.) Maintain visibility, or relationships, with ALL of your publics; your target market as well as opinion leaders, key influencers and secondary and tertiary markets. Tides change in the world and in business, and there may be a time when your secondary and tertiary markets become important to your bottom line or your position in your industry.

As you prepare for media interviews, presentations and panels, identify logical places where it makes sense to address the needs of your secondary and tertiary markets and key influencers.

3. Draw out silent members of your audience.

There will be times when a segment of your target audience or certain stakeholders do not speak out. Instead of assuming they will not do so at some point or that the silent members of your group or audience support you, take steps to find out what they truly believe and want.

During media interviews and presentations, make reference to the ways people can provide feedback and make their voices heard, such as a text line/hotline, online form or other forum you have created to gather feedback and ideas.

4. Nurture relationships.

Just because someone has been supportive of you in the past, doesn’t mean the relationship will be fine in set-it-and-forget-it mode. It’s easier to maintain a relationship than to rebuild it.

Take advantage of opportunities during media interviews, presentations and panel discussions to acknowledge the people or organizations that have been your long-time supporters. If you can address how you serve their needs, your moments in the public eye can help to maintain your relationships.

5. Identify and fill the gaps of dissatisfaction.

Consider how you can discover and address unmet needs and dissatisfied people. Most successful companies and products were inspired by one individual’s desire for, or identification of, something that was lacking in the marketplace.

When preparing for media interviews, presentations and panel discussions, create messaging regarding what you and/or your organization have done to discover and fill the unmet needs of your supporters and those who are dissatisfied with the status quo. Show them how you provide the solutions they are seeking.

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

Trust and Body Language

Trust and Body Language

“I don’t trust you. I don’t know why, there’s just something about you.” – These are words some entrepreneurs have heard spoken on “Shark Tank” and they’re words that no one wants to hear after a media interview, presentation or pitch. What leads to a lack of trust? Quite often it’s body language. In conversations or when watching you in media interviews or presentations, people generally pay more attention to body language than they are consciously aware of doing. Most people process language and speech in the left hemisphere, and nonverbal or spatial skills in the right hemisphere. While your audience or viewers may hear every word you say, part of their brain is assessing your body language, noticing any disparities between your words and your movements or other “tells” that may indicate the lack of truthfulness, confidence or commitment to your words. The more you know your material well, are committed to your ideas and gain the confidence that comes from mastering your content, the more your body language and movements will be authentic and synchronized with your words. This will help you to establish trust with your audience. Read a more in-depth post about body language.

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

How to Avoid Using Jargon in Media Interviews and Communications – Tips from a Media Trainer

How to Avoid Using Jargon in Media Interviews and Communications – Tips from a Media Trainer

There is a reason you may be seeing lots of articles about the overuse of jargon. It’s especially important to avoid using jargon in media interviews.

What would you think or feel if you heard this statement from a company spokesperson?

“We’re incentivizing our brand evangelists to virally spread our high-level content by gifting them with digital aviation rewards. It’s this outside-the-box thinking that yields us much more than the low-hanging fruit our competitors pull down, which is mission-critical given our current bandwidth.”

“Ummm…what?” might be your answer.

It would probably be clearer and easier to listen to this statement:

“We created a program that allows fans of our content to share it and earn airline points. It’s creative thought like this that’s helping us to grow more quickly than our competitors, which is especially important with our current staff and resources.”

Simple and clear language is usually the most effective way to communicate in almost any situation. It’s best to avoid using jargon in media interviews because your audience may consist of a variety of people with a range of knowledge. Generally, you will want your message to be well understood by the vast majority of people who will hear it or read it.

Jargon is defined in the Merriam Webster dictionary as follows:

“Jargon – (noun) – the language used for a particular activity or by a particular group of people.”

The use of jargon seems to be increasing, especially as the use of technology and Internet spreads. Some jargon is useful, but this is usually within the confines of people who work within a specific industry. Because jargon is often used with people of varying backgrounds, it is often misunderstood.

People may use jargon for several reasons:

• They don’t know how to explain something in simpler terms.

• They want to appear more eloquent or knowledgeable than they are.

• They are afraid that if they use more plain language people will assume they don’t know their industry’s jargon.

• Or, they are unaware that they are doing so.

In media interviews or presentations, before you use jargon, consider the knowledge base of your audience and their frame of reference. If you are accustomed to using a lot of jargon that is specific to your industry and you are addressing people outside of your industry, think about the alternate meanings your words may have to them.

What happens when people don’t understand your jargon:

• They may stop focusing on what you’re saying as their minds fixate on trying to figure out the meanings of the terms or words they didn’t understand.

• They may feel that your message is not meant for them, so they may tune you out.

• Or, they may feel that you’re trying to speak above their level, which may cause them to resent you.

How to know when to use jargon. Ask yourself:

• Is the jargon the best way to communicate your thought or to represent an object, concept or process?

• Who is your audience? Will your audience understand the jargon you are using? If not, would learning the meaning of the jargon help your audience members? If so, are you able to define the jargon for them?

Here are some ways to catch yourself using jargon, so you can curb it when needed:

• Set a digital recorder near you when you’re on the phone or meeting with people. Play it back and listen closely for the unnecessary or excessive use of jargon.

• Review your written correspondence to see how much jargon you’ve included. You could even keep a list of jargon that you don’t want to use and search your documents for the words or terms you want to omit.

How to know if you are using jargon:

• Are the words you are using NOT in the dictionary? If not, they may be jargon or they may be made up.

• Are many of the nouns you use actually verbs that have been modified to become nouns?

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

To arrange a free consultation, call us at 310-479-0217. Or, you can email us at [email protected]
I’m Just a… And Other Undermining Statements to Avoid – Communication Tips from a Media Trainer

I’m Just a… And Other Undermining Statements to Avoid – Communication Tips from a Media Trainer

Our word choices in interviews, speeches, presentations, and even casual conversations, say more about us than most people may realize. Many people undermine themselves without even knowing it.

Have you ever heard the owner of a small business say, “We’re just a small…” or an entrepreneur say, “I’m just a…”? The words “just a” immediately diminish their accomplishments.

I often hear stay-at-home mothers undermine themselves similarly, saying, “I’m just a mom.” This minimizes the importance of what they do. Instead they could say, “I’m a full-time mother,” and leave it at that. Or, they could say, “I’m taking time to focus on my family full-time right now,” which may feel more comfortable for women who plan to return to the workforce.

Other ways that people may undermine themselves is to talk about their perceived limitations as business people. People say things like, “I’m so disorganized,” or “I’m a mess,” or “I’m overwhelmed.” All of these statements make one appear out of control, incompetent and/or not very reliable.

Undermining statements like the ones above are a form of negative self-talk. In addition to diminishing your accomplishments, negative self-talk can take the form of putting yourself down or not accepting compliments.

Remember that everything you say to others, you are reinforcing in your own mind. Your brain cannot help but to hear those self-deprecating words and, more than likely, you will internalize them. Don’t say anything about yourself that you don’t want to be true.

Eliminating negative self-talk is important for anyone. It is not productive, it is disempowering, and it reinforces beliefs you don’t want to hold about yourself.

Get used to confidently stating what you do without diminishing or minimizing yourself or your accomplishments in any way.

If you’d like to become a more powerful communicator and make more conscious word choices, my Confident and Clear Communication program provides lessons in audio recordings you can listen to anywhere, anytime, as well as PDFs you can download or read online.

 

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

To arrange a free consultation, call us at 310-479-0217. Or, you can email us at [email protected]

Pin It on Pinterest