Expert Media Training™ Blog Among Top-Ranking Public Speaking Blogs

Expert Media Training™ Blog Among Top-Ranking Public Speaking Blogs

I am honored that my blog has been named one of the top 50 public speaking blogs by Feedspot. Of the thousands of public speaking blogs, Feedspot ranked ours as number 30. I am grateful to be in good company among my respected peers.

“These blogs are ranked based on following criteria:

  • Google reputation and Google search ranking
  • Influence and popularity on Facebook, twitter and other social media sites
  • Quality and consistency of posts
  • Feedspot’s editorial team and expert review”

To read more of the blogs on Feedspot’s site, click here.

I strive to provide content that is relevant to my readers. I welcome requests to cover specific topics within the arenas of public speaking, presentations, media interviews and investor pitching.

Please email topic requests to my team and me at team@expertmediatraining.com.

Lisa Elia, Founder of Expert Media Training™

 

Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer, Pitch Coach, Blog AuthorThis post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach and communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY Show, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To receive articles like this directly in your inbox click here.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training™ office at 310-479-0217.

Crisis Communication Tips

Crisis Communication Tips

The following crisis communication tips are meant to provide you with your initial steps. If you need help managing a crisis, call us immediately at 310-479-0217.

Quite often, the clients who call us for help managing their crisis communications and preparing their executives or clients to face the media are doing so because they have not planned for crises, which everyone who is in business should do.

If you’re a service provider, crises can arise from several situations, including being discredited publicly, a verbal misunderstanding or use of a poor choice of words. If you produce a product, crises can arise from a fault in your product, problems with distribution or questionable manufacturing procedures, among other things. These things can happen to individuals or companies of any size, from one-person shops to the largest corporations in the world.

For celebrities, athletes and other public figures, how a crisis is managed can make the difference between preserving or losing lucrative endorsement deals and prospects.

Quick crisis communication tips to get you started:

Crisis communication tip #1: Don’t hide.

If a situation that reflects negatively on you, your client or your company has become public knowledge and the media are contacting you for a comment, here are some steps to follow:

Do not answer their questions on the spot, but do take their calls and tell them you will get back to them within a certain timeframe, whether it’s minutes or hours, but try to do it quickly enough for them to meet their respective story deadlines. Stall tactics rarely work. If the media print or broadcast that you did not respond to their requests for information, the public may assume you’re guilty or that you have something to hide, which is not what you want.

Get help creating a statement and answers to the questions you may be asked by the press. In the heat of the moment, you may not think as clearly as usual. Enlisting the aid of experts who are objective and forward-thinking can help you to contain and manage the situation most effectively.

Crisis communication tip #2: Control contact with media and the public.

Don’t allow your staff members or team members to speak with the press about the situation. Ask that your family members and friends do not do so either.

Ideally, employees, vendors and others should have been advised not to speak to the media on your behalf. Perhaps they have even signed confidentiality agreements, as does everyone who works in our firm. However, it’s good to remind them of your policies.

Crisis communication tip #3: Take responsibility when appropriate.

There are times when it’s best to assume responsibility and quickly address what you are doing to rectify a situation. For example, if you sold a product that turns out to be faulty, consult a lawyer about what you should and should not say about it, but do address it. You can recall the product through news alerts that you send to the media and distribute through social media, if many have been sold. If only a few products have been sold, you can contact the customers directly and offer them a refund or a replacement of the product.

The worst thing you can do is ignore the situation, which can lead people to hire lawyers, investigate further and generally make a bigger deal of something that could have been kept in check with some simple communication.

Crisis communication tip #4: Listen.

Sometimes the best way to prevent a situation from becoming a crisis is to listen. Listen to people’s complaints and comments, even if there is nothing that can be done about them.

For example, if you have said something regrettable to someone who is now making a public issue of it, apologize to the person directly, which may make the situation go away: sometimes people just need to be heard.

If the issue continues to become more public, seek professional help to address the situation. This is not a time to wing it, and professionals can help you create a clear message and make a plan for damage control and containment.

Crisis communication tip #5: Take action.

Explain how you are taking action to address the situation. For example, if one of your staff members has said something inappropriate to someone, craft a specific response that explains why this is not in accordance with your company policy and how the employee is being reprimanded (or dismissed, in some cases). If you have implemented new policies due to this situation, explain what they are.

When crises arise, the most important thing to do is to not panic. Then, get the help you need to create a swift and thorough crisis communication plan.


Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer and Founder of Expert Media Training™This article was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, communication expert and speaker. In addition to helping clients with crisis communication management and planning, she trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with The Today Show, Good Morning America, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has been interviewed and shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Fox News, Entertainment Tonight, E! Entertainment and many others.

To arrange a complimentary consultation, call us at 310-479-0217.

Or, you can email us at team@expertmediatraining.com


 

Five Tips to Make the Most of Media Interviews, Presentations and Panels – Inspired by the Presidential Election

Five Tips to Make the Most of Media Interviews, Presentations and Panels – Inspired by the Presidential Election

The recent presidential election in U.S. has led to many heated and varied discussions on the topic of communication. This article will not delve into what either candidate or party did effectively or not. These tips for media interviews, presentations and panels are based on an analysis of what the election uncovered that will be useful when addressing the public, particularly for our clientele; business leaders and thought leaders, including entertainers, athletes and other public figures.

Five tips to make the most of media interviews, presentations and panels, inspired by the recent election:

 1. Know what drives your audience at any given time; pain avoidance or aspiration.

Some people are more motivated to avoid pain, thus the “speak to their pain points” advice that has proliferated on the Internet for the past decade. Others are more motivated by their aspirations or ideals. Most people’s motivations can vacillate between pain avoidance and aspiration, depending on the matter at hand.

When preparing for media interviews, presentations and panel discussions, consider which form of motivation is strongest for your audience in relation to the topic you are discussing and shape your messages accordingly.

2. Pay attention to the fringes.

Many people focus only on their primary target market and they often ignore or overlook smaller market segments and key influencers. (Key influencers are the people who influence your target audience’s decision-making process and can include business advisors in other fields, managers, agents, assistants and spouses, among others.) Maintain visibility, or relationships, with ALL of your publics; your target market as well as opinion leaders, key influencers and secondary and tertiary markets. Tides change in the world and in business, and there may be a time when your secondary and tertiary markets become important to your bottom line or your position in your industry.

As you prepare for media interviews, presentations and panels, identify logical places where it makes sense to address the needs of your secondary and tertiary markets and key influencers.

3. Draw out silent members of your audience.

There will be times when a segment of your target audience or certain stakeholders do not speak out. Instead of assuming they will not do so at some point or that the silent members of your group or audience support you, take steps to find out what they truly believe and want.

During media interviews and presentations, make reference to the ways people can provide feedback and make their voices heard, such as a text line/hotline, online form or other forum you have created to gather feedback and ideas.

4. Nurture relationships.

Just because someone has been supportive of you in the past, doesn’t mean the relationship will be fine in set-it-and-forget-it mode. It’s easier to maintain a relationship than to rebuild it.

Take advantage of opportunities during media interviews, presentations and panel discussions to acknowledge the people or organizations that have been your long-time supporters. If you can address how you serve their needs, your moments in the public eye can help to maintain your relationships.

5. Identify and fill the gaps of dissatisfaction.

Consider how you can discover and address unmet needs and dissatisfied people. Most successful companies and products were inspired by one individual’s desire for, or identification of, something that was lacking in the marketplace.

When preparing for media interviews, presentations and panel discussions, create messaging regarding what you and/or your organization have done to discover and fill the unmet needs of your supporters and those who are dissatisfied with the status quo. Show them how you provide the solutions they are seeking.

Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer, Pitch Coach, Blog AuthorThis post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach and communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY Show, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To receive articles like this directly in your inbox click here.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training™ office at 310-479-0217.

Trust and Body Language

Trust and Body Language

“I don’t trust you. I don’t know why, there’s just something about you.” – These are words some entrepreneurs have heard spoken on “Shark Tank” and they’re words that no one wants to hear after a media interview, presentation or pitch. What leads to a lack of trust? Quite often it’s body language. In conversations or when watching you in media interviews or presentations, people generally pay more attention to body language than they are consciously aware of doing. Most people process language and speech in the left hemisphere, and nonverbal or spatial skills in the right hemisphere. While your audience or viewers may hear every word you say, part of their brain is assessing your body language, noticing any disparities between your words and your movements or other “tells” that may indicate the lack of truthfulness, confidence or commitment to your words. The more you know your material well, are committed to your ideas and gain the confidence that comes from mastering your content, the more your body language and movements will be authentic and synchronized with your words. This will help you to establish trust with your audience. Read a more in-depth post about body language.

Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer, Pitch Coach, Blog AuthorThis post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach and communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY Show, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To receive articles like this directly in your inbox click here.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training™ office at 310-479-0217.

Memorizing Speeches and Interview Responses Can Cause Detachment

Memorizing Speeches and Interview Responses Can Cause Detachment

Verbatim memorization of a speech or responses to interview questions can detach you from your content and from the very people you’re trying to reach; the audience, the interviewer, investors.

Memorization places your focus on remembering exact words and phrases, instead of where it should be, which is on communicating your ideas or information with emotion and effectiveness.

For the vast majority of people, attempting to deliver word-for-word speeches, pitches or interview responses backfires. Here are a few reasons I don’t recommend verbatim memorization:

1. Memorizing content word-for-word can detach you from the meaning of the words. Saying something the exact same way over and over can dull the emotions attached to your content to a point where it almost becomes meaningless. If you rehearse your presentation or interview responses repeatedly with the same wording, you may even develop “semantic satiation,” in which certain words temporarily stop having meaning to you.

2. Delivering content that you have memorized can detach you from the audience or interviewer because when you focus on retrieving exact words for a long stretch of time, you are not as fully present in the moment. This would emotionally detach you from the very people you’re trying to reach with your message.

3. With a memorized verbatim speech or response, if you become distracted and forget one word or phrase, you can feel completely lost and throw your entire presentation or interview off course.

4. The pressure of knowing you must remember a verbatim speech can heighten nervousness or anxiety you might feel before a presentation or interview. Why put that extra pressure on yourself?

The temptation to memorize presentations, speeches or responses to interview questions lies in the generally erroneous belief that this will offer some guarantee of success. Adding to this, sometimes people become very attached to specific phrases that they believe sound great. As any good editor will tell you, it’s dangerous to fall in love with your words: they might get eliminated.

Instead of memorizing your presentation, speech or media interview responses, do this:

1. Map out the journey you want to take people on with your presentation or interview responses.

2. Master your content. It’s best to know and thoroughly comprehend everything you’re talking about. For CEOs and other company spokespeople who may be asked about a wide array of topics that may or may not fall within their areas of expertise, this can be challenging. For them, some of the content to master would include explanations of who can address the question and why this is so.

3. Practice verbalizing your content multiple different ways and many times. Knowing a lot about a subject is quite different than speaking about it confidently, concisely and compellingly.

“It usually takes me more than three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech,” Mark Twain said.

4. Get feedback. It’s difficult to assess your own effectiveness in conveying your message, your body language and overall communication style. Feedback from a trusted source can help.

If you want to feel fully prepared and confident for interviews, presentations or pitches my advice is to get professional training. The preparation techniques, feedback, skill development and outside perspective that a good trainer provides can save you years of trying to figure things out on your own and enable you to be the best communicator you can be. You might be thinking that of course I would advise this, given that I’m a media trainer and presentation trainer, but I wouldn’t have become a trainer if I hadn’t seen the great need for thorough and thoughtful training in my many years as a PR counselor and publicist.

If you or someone in your organization seems pulled toward memorizing a presentation, remember this: People want to feel that you’re communicating with them from your heart and your head and that the ideas or information you are conveying are so much a part of you that you don’t need to memorize a speech or response to speak about them. Unless you’re an amazing actor (on par with Academy Award winners), you probably can’t make your memorized words appear to be thoughts that are emerging naturally. If you seem unnatural, you will be perceived as lacking in authenticity or confidence.

Confidence comes from mastery, and mastery comes from proper preparation and practice.

Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer, Pitch Coach, Blog AuthorThis post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach and communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY Show, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To receive articles like this directly in your inbox click here.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training™ office at 310-479-0217.

How to Handle Questions about Politics and Society – Media Training Tips for Actors and Music Artists

How to Handle Questions about Politics and Society – Media Training Tips for Actors and Music Artists

There are many old adages about the topics to avoid in polite company – politics, religion and race being among them. These rules of etiquette have slipped away in most of society and they don’t necessarily apply to media interviews, especially when it comes to public figures.

Once people achieve celebrity status, it is not unusual for members of the media to ask them questions about their opinions on a wide variety of topics that extend far beyond their art or craft. For example, actors who star in TV shows or movies that center around politics or social issues are especially apt to find themselves facing questions pertaining to the topics addressed by their work. Members of the media may ask actors, music artists and others in the entertainment industry questions about the status of gender issues, race relations, or the state of the entertainment industry. Some artists feel comfortable answering such questions, either because they have gained the knowledge to feel prepared to do so or because they simply want to share their opinions. Others prefer to keep their opinions on such topics to themselves.

Whatever choice is made about sharing thoughts on any sensitive topic, giving forethought to the choice and its potential consequences and effects on the talent’s brand, fan base and position in the entertainment industry will help the talent and his/her team to feel prepared for media interviews. This same consideration should be given to social media posting.

When providing media training for actors and music artists some of the questions we address with the client are these:

  • Are there potential benefits to the talent sharing opinions on this topic? If so, do the benefits outweigh the potential negative fallout of the talent discussing this topic?
  • How much does the talent want to continue discussing this topic in this interview and future interviews?
  • Can the talent handle more probing and pointed questions about the topic and his/her authority on it?
  • Does this topic tie into any of the talent’s projects or philanthropic endeavors?
  • Could the talent alienate a segment of his/her core audience or fan base by sharing opinions on this topic? If so, is it still worthwhile to share his/her opinions?

Once these questions are answered, we move forward with helping the client to communicate the messages he/she wants to share.

Preparing for questions about sensitive topics prior to media interviews is the best way to create a communication strategy that positions talent well and to protect talent him/her from saying something regrettable, becoming rattled, or derailing a media interview.

To learn more about our media training for actors, music artists or other public figures, call us at 310-479-0217 or email team@expertmediatraining.com

Save

Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer, Pitch Coach, Blog AuthorThis post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach and communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY Show, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To receive articles like this directly in your inbox click here.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training™ office at 310-479-0217.

Six Essentials to Make Your Business Appealing to Media and Customers

Six Essentials to Make Your Business Appealing to Media and Customers

When you are busy running your business, it can be challenging to take a step back and assess it as a total stranger would do. People often develop their marketing and publicity initiatives from the position of what they want to communicate or accomplish. This is only half of the equation if you want to be successful.

As a media trainer, presentation trainer and pitch coach, my work with every client begins with gaining an understanding of who they are, what they represent, what they want to communicate and where they want to go. Then, we look at what people (such as customers, investors, employees and media) will want from them, which enables me to help them shape their messages and refine their delivery.

Six Essentials to Make Your Business Appealing to Media and Customers

1. Novelty: Be Fresh and Original

People are generally more protective of their dollars and hours than they had been years ago: what captures attention are products, services and ideas that are inspired, not knock-offs or very slightly modified versions of someone else’s creation. Develop products, services and messages that feel like they’re bubbling out of you. The world is waiting for your inspired inventions and ideas.

2. Invigoration: Bonus if You make it Fun

As a society, we have daily many reminders of how serious life can be, so we gravitate toward people who seem to truly enjoy giving us the products or services we want or need. We like to watch people who seem to light up when they talk about their creations or ideas, and we often like them even more when they provide us with an experience that’s invigorating or fun. Feeling motivated, challenged, awakened and enlightened can be fun for a lot of people. How can you create a fun or invigorating experience for the people whose lives your business touches?

3. Direction: Provide Road Maps

People don’t want to feel that they’re falling short or not doing enough, or that they’re being challenged to arrive at a destination without knowing how to get there. They want you to help them get from where they are to where they want to go: they want road maps. This is true of the solutions you provide as well as the messages you delivery.

4. Inclusion: Something for Everyone

Although you have a primary target audience and you’re not trying to be all things to all people, you can provide something for everyone who wants what you have to offer. Even people who can’t afford your products or services can take a piece of your brand with them in the form of a free sample, a captivating photo or inspiring words that you might use in a tagline. Think of how Nike’s “Just Do It” has motivated people and encouraged people to move forward with challenging projects or business launches that have nothing to do with athletic shoes. What can you give to everyone who comes into contact with you or your business?

5. Authenticity: No Wizard behind the Curtain

While you can outsource some things, if you outsource your blogging and social media posting, or you hire someone to write your website text, make sure the message truly reflects your thoughts and your tone. What you don’t want to have happen is for someone to pull back the curtain to reveal the fraudulent little old man at the controls, like Toto did in “The Wizard of Oz”. People want to know who you really are, especially if they’re going to do business with you or refer others to you. The more authentic you are in all your communications, the more people will want to spend their valuable time with you or reading your e-mails, social media posts or watching your videos.

6. Integrity: Stand behind Everything

While you may have heard this over and over again for years, integrity is imperative. Build your business on a solid foundation and stand behind not only your products and services, but also your staff. Do everything you can to live up to your mission statement, customer service guarantees and other messages you disseminate. It will pay off in more good word-of-mouth mentions than you could pay for.

Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer, Pitch Coach, Blog AuthorThis post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach and communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY Show, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To receive articles like this directly in your inbox click here.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training™ office at 310-479-0217.

Ethics in Business: How Spying on and Copying Competitors can Backfire and Harm Your Brand

Ethics in Business: How Spying on and Copying Competitors can Backfire and Harm Your Brand

People sometimes become so fixated on what their competitors are doing that they get desperate and resort to unethical, and even fraudulent, practices to get the inside scoop on them.

While it’s good to know who your competitors are and what they offer so you can differentiate yourself, it’s not a great idea to copy what they do. What you need to know about competitors to differentiate yourself is usually available online.

Don’t try to extract confidential information from competitors by posing as a potential client.

This is what NOT to do to conduct research on your competitors. Don’t call them pretending to be a client, or the representative of a client, in order to attain information about their pricing and to access materials they would not share with a competitor. It’s dishonest, fraudulent and, in many cases, against the law.

Cornell University Law School’s website contains easy-to-read information on this law: https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/50/1708

Here is an example from my own recent experience: a woman who used to be a TV producer called and asked me about media training for her “client”. We’ll call her Ms. Shady. Under the guise of looking to hire a media trainer for her client, Ms. Shady asked about my prices and dug for details about my training process. A few weeks later, I noticed that she and her business partner had created a website and are offering media training services. Several  sentences on her website look as if she copied them from the quote I had sent her and then simply rearranged the wording. I highly doubt all of this was a coincidence, especially because when I checked her domain name registration, it showed that she had purchased her domain name a few months previous, so it seems that her plans for her firm were in place before she called me.

Using the example of Ms. Shady, here are several reasons why this deceptive practice is a bad idea:

  1. If you work in an advisory capacity with clients, your ethics will matter to those who have ethics.

Would your clients be impressed if they found out that you lie to get what you want? Probably not.

Could your clients find out that you lie to get what you want? Probably.

Lying to get what you want is generally not a great idea. People whose creativity does not lift them above lying probably shouldn’t be advising anyone on anything.

  1. You want your competitors to respect you.

Sometimes people will ask your competitors what they know about you. Referencing Ms. Shady once again, if anyone asked me about her, I would feel compelled to share the truth: she told me she was interested in my services in order to gain confidential information. It appears that she was doing so deceptively/fraudulently to gather competitive information.

Competitors can sometimes be a source of referrals.

There are times when your competitors will be too busy to take on a client or they come across someone who is not the right fit for them, and they may want to refer this person to a competitor. I happen to do this quite often. Using the example of Ms. Shady, do you think I would ever refer her business? I definitely would not.

  1. Don’t waste your competitors’ time and income potential.

Respect people’s time on earth and the value of their time at work. Every minute of your competitor’s time that you waste having him or her believe there is a potential deal in motion is time you take away from that person to do something productive in business, with family or for the world. There is an opportunity cost to everything.

To build a strong, ethical brand, focus on what you have to offer and how you want to conduct business.

  1. Differentiate yourself.

Instead of trying to copy competitors, think about what you have to offer that is unique and special and authentically your creation. This is especially true if you are a service provider. Trying to replicate the way another person provides a service will often backfire because you will probably not have the same education, life experience, personality and sensibilities as the competitor you are trying to copy.

People who feel so insecure about their level of knowledge on their subject matter or processes that they need to replicate others should re-think their readiness to enter the market.

  1. Make business ethics a part of your brand.

Most large corporations and many small companies have standards of behavior and codes of ethics. Your code of ethics becomes a part of your brand, internally and externally, whether you intend it to or not.

  1. Use your personal experiences and life influences to create your own brand.

The most creative and useful services and products are often created by combining elements from several influences. Your influences will not be exactly the same as those of your competitors.

Instead of closely copying competitors, be the best version of yourself. Create your own processes and products. Focus on serving the people who want to work with you because of who you are and what you have to offer. The more you do this, the more distinct and powerful your brand will become.

To your personal brand and success!


 

Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer, Pitch Coach, Blog AuthorThis post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach and communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY Show, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To receive articles like this directly in your inbox click here.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training™ office at 310-479-0217.

5 Quick Communication Tips

5 Quick Communication Tips

1. Above all else, get your employees/contractors trained to reflect and embody your company’s brand and work ethic, or nothing will be done to your standards.

2. Every promotional piece of content you put out into the world should have a strategy behind it.

3. Who you know right now is not as important as knowing how to present yourself and your work so the right people want to know you.

4. When shaping your communication, always think about what’s in it for them (whichever audience you are addressing — investors, employees, clients, press, etc.). If you are addressing team members, you might also need to consider that they believe they contribute and deserve.

5. Remember that wherever you are, and in whatever situation you find yourself, you are representing your brand and possibly attracting opportunities. Present yourself accordingly.

Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer, Pitch Coach, Blog AuthorThis post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach and communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY Show, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To receive articles like this directly in your inbox click here.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training™ office at 310-479-0217.


Here are links to a few other articles you might enjoy:

Body Language in Interviews and Meetings – Nonverbal Communication

https://expertmediatraining.com/body-language-in-interviews-and-meetings/

How To Prepare for Presentations – 6 Tips for Effective Presentations

https://expertmediatraining.com/how-to-prepare-for-presentations/

Prepare for Media Interviews BEFORE You Book One

https://expertmediatraining.com/prepare-for-tv-interviews-media-trainer-tips/

Frequently Asked Questions about Media Training

https://expertmediatraining.com/faqs-about-media-training/


Choose Your Communication Method Wisely

Choose Your Communication Method Wisely

With all the options we have for communicating today, choosing the right method is more important than ever. It’s easy to become overly reliant on one form of communication, but as Marshall McLuhan wrote, “The medium is the message.” People sometimes assume that the communication method you choose in any given situation is a reflection of what you think of them and the level of importance you assign to the message.

Have you ever received a negative response to an email that you intended to be neutral or positive? Or, have you sent a text thinking it would be quicker than a phone call or email, but what resulted was an hour of texting messages back and forth?

A colleague called me, distraught because a client had let her firm go after receiving an email that she’d sent. Apparently, this client was demanding more from her and her firm than they were contracted to receive, so she sent the client an email that clearly outlined the parameters of their services and set very strong boundaries. When she read the email to me, I could understand how, without the benefit of her kind voice, the email could have been construed as harsh and off-putting. This was a perfect example of how the wrong method of communication can destroy a relationship.

To download this article click here.

Here are some criteria to help you choose your communication methods wisely:

1. Level of sensitivity of information to be communicated

I listed this first because this is the most important criterion to consider. If what you have to communicate is a sensitive issue, could be misinterpreted in any way, or requires a high level of security, consider communicating by phone or in person.
Emails and texts can easily be misinterpreted without the nonverbal and aural cues you can provide in person or on the phone. Phone calls and in-person meetings also provide you with the benefit of being able to immediately respond to any questions or address potential misunderstandings. With emails and texts, you run a greater risk of the recipient overanalyzing or misinterpreting your communication or missing it completely.

For more neutral communication, emails and texts are sometimes best.

2. Relationship

What is your relationship with the person with whom you are communicating? Is this person a client, new business prospect, vendor, friend, or loved one? Your relationship greatly affects how your message will be received in relation to the communication method you choose. For example, most people would probably not want you to text them with a high-level new business offer, but your vendor would probably welcome a text alerting him or her that you’re running late for a meeting.

3. Communication method the recipient prefers

Some people prefer texts, some prefer emails, some prefer to talk on the phone, and some prefer to meet in person: the other party’s preferences could come into play when deciding how you would like to communicate. However, your business practices and life choices can also influence how you choose to communicate.

If you are communicating with your vendors or your staff, you will sometimes be the one to decide which communication method will be used, but it still would be good to consider the other criteria listed here.

In your personal life, you might choose to limit texts or emails. For example, when making plans with one or two friends, I will generally do it by phone because coordinating schedules is easier when we can look at our calendars and immediately book a date. Some people communicate with their friends primarily via text. It’s all a matter of personal choice (and, perhaps, generation).

4. Your preferred communication method

Do you shine during in-person meetings? If so, try to set up in-person meetings when important matters will be discussed. However, know that many people don’t want to spend the time to meet in person initially, so you may want to sharpen your phone and email-writing skills.

Are your texts tweet-worthy? Use your way with whittling down words and emojis to your advantage, with the people who will appreciate your texting skills.

Be flexible with your communication methods to avoid possible negative consequences. For example, I know a woman who likes to have sensitive conversations in person, but there have been times when her unwillingness to have such conversations by phone has created rifts in relationships because too much time lapsed before an in-person meeting could be arranged.

You can make it clear with your vendors and friends how you’d like for them to reach you. To catch up on life with friends, I prefer to have phone conversations if we can’t meet in person. Long emails feel like work, not pleasure, to me.

5. Amount of information to be shared

If you have a lot of information to be shared, consider putting it in writing, especially if it’s something people will need to refer to again in the future. If you are sending a very long, content-dense email, consider also attaching it as a downloadable document in case the recipient wants to keep it outside of their email system. If you have a quick update to share, consider a text or email.

6. Urgency

If what you are communicating is urgent, consider how you can reach the recipient most quickly in the way that he or she will receive your message. Reality check: most people don’t consider email urgent. Phone and text are generally the best ways to communicate urgent messages. If it’s extremely important and urgent, consider phone, text and email.

I remember receiving a call from an editor friend who was annoyed that she was waiting at a restaurant for one of our mutual friends. She later told me that she missed the email from the friend who was canceling plans at the last minute. This is an example of a situation where a phone call would have definitely been in order.

7. Efficiency of the communication process

When you need a short response and your matter is not urgent, email or text can be best. With very busy people who may not check emails and texts very often throughout the day, sometimes a quick phone call is most efficient.

If your communication is going to precipitate a lot of back-and-forth communication, consider which communication method will be most efficient. When coordinating schedules. If you’re not using an online scheduling system, texting can take longer than a quick phone call.

Take a moment to think through the entire process and organize your communication accordingly. For example, you may decide to email a document, follow up with a phone-call to alert your client to review and then set up a time to discuss it in detail.

Here’s a quick-reference list to keep on hand:

1. When delivering delicate information, pick up the phone or meet in person.

2. When you must convey a lot of detailed information, email may be best.

3. When sending directions, phone numbers, and similar information, you may want to text and/or email.

4. If your message is time-sensitive, consider using two forms of communication, such as an email and a phone call or text (depending on your recipient).

5. Snail mail is still good for a personal, handwritten note, like a thank you note.

6. If you have something extremely important to discuss, consider doing it in person. I’m amazed when I hear of people breaking up via text. So cold!

7. Skype and other video conferencing programs are great communication options. I even conduct some of my media training sessions with overseas clients via video conference.

8. As I’ve written in previous posts, don’t put anything in writing (email/text/social media) that you wouldn’t want plastered on the front page of the New York Times.

To download this article click here.

Lisa Elia, Media Trainer, Presentation Trainer, Pitch Coach, Blog AuthorThis post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach and communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY Show, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To receive articles like this directly in your inbox click here.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training™ office at 310-479-0217.

Pin It on Pinterest