Five Tips to Make the Most of Media Interviews, Presentations and Panels

Five Tips to Make the Most of Media Interviews, Presentations and Panels

 1. Know what drives your audience at any given time; pain avoidance or aspiration.

Some people are more motivated to avoid pain, thus the “speak to their pain points” advice that has proliferated on the Internet for the past decade. Others are more motivated by their aspirations or ideals. Most people’s motivations can vacillate between pain avoidance and aspiration, depending on the matter at hand. READ MORE

Trust and Body Language

Trust and Body Language

“I don’t trust you. I don’t know why, there’s just something about you.” – These are words some entrepreneurs have heard spoken on “Shark Tank” and they’re words that no one wants to hear after a media interview, presentation or pitch. What leads to a lack of trust? Quite often it’s body language. In conversations or when watching you in media interviews or presentations, people generally pay more attention to body language than they are consciously aware of doing. Most people process language and speech in the left hemisphere, and nonverbal or spatial skills in the right hemisphere. While your audience or viewers may hear every word you say, part of their brain is assessing your body language, noticing any disparities between your words and your movements or other “tells” that may indicate the lack of truthfulness, confidence or commitment to your words. The more you know your material well, are committed to your ideas and gain the confidence that comes from mastering your content, the more your body language and movements will be authentic and synchronized with your words. This will help you to establish trust with your audience. Read a more in-depth post about body language.

Lisa Elia, Founder & Lead Media Trainer & Presentation Trainer at Expert Media Training®This post was written by Lisa Elia, a Los Angeles-based media trainer, presentation trainer, pitch coach, communication expert and speaker. She trains clients for media interviews, speeches, internal and external presentations, investor presentations and promotional videos. With more than 20 years of experience, Lisa has prepared clients for interviews with TODAY, GMA, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ESPN, and hundreds of other outlets. Lisa has shared her expertise with national media outlets that include Inc., Entertainment Tonight, E! and many others.

To discuss your training needs, contact the Expert Media Training office at 310-479-0217.

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Memorizing Speeches and Interview Responses Can Cause Detachment

Memorizing Speeches and Interview Responses Can Cause Detachment

Verbatim memorization of a speech or responses to interview questions can detach you from your content and from the very people you’re trying to reach; the audience, the interviewer, investors.

Memorization places your focus on remembering exact words and phrases, instead of where it should be, which is on communicating your ideas or information with emotion and effectiveness. READ MORE

How to Handle Questions about Politics and Society – Media Training Tips for Actors and Music Artists

How to Handle Questions about Politics and Society – Media Training Tips for Actors and Music Artists

There are many old adages about the topics to avoid in polite company – politics, religion and race being among them. These rules of etiquette have slipped away in most of society and they don’t necessarily apply to media interviews, especially when it comes to public figures.

Once people achieve celebrity status, it is not unusual for members of the media to ask them questions about their opinions on a wide variety of topics that extend far beyond their art or craft. For example, actors who star in TV shows or movies that center around politics or social issues are especially apt to find themselves facing questions pertaining to the topics addressed by their work. Members of the media may ask actors, music artists and others in the entertainment industry questions about the status of gender issues, race relations, or the state of the entertainment industry. Some artists feel comfortable answering such questions, either because they have gained the knowledge to feel prepared to do so or because they simply want to share their opinions. Others prefer to keep their opinions on such topics to themselves. READ MORE

Six Essentials to Make Your Business Appealing to Media and Customers

Six Essentials to Make Your Business Appealing to Media and Customers

When you are busy running your business, it can be challenging to take a step back and assess it as a total stranger would do. People often develop their marketing and publicity initiatives from the position of what they want to communicate or accomplish. This is only half of the equation if you want to be successful.

As a media trainer, presentation trainer and pitch coach, my work with every client begins with gaining an understanding of who they are, what they represent, what they want to communicate and where they want to go. Then, we look at what people (such as customers, investors, employees and media) will want from them, which enables me to help them shape their messages and refine their delivery. READ MORE

Ethics in Business: How Spying on and Copying Competitors can Backfire and Harm Your Brand

Ethics in Business: How Spying on and Copying Competitors can Backfire and Harm Your Brand

People sometimes become so fixated on what their competitors are doing that they get desperate and resort to unethical, and even fraudulent, practices to get the inside scoop on them.

While it’s good to know who your competitors are and what they offer so you can differentiate yourself, it’s not a great idea to copy what they do. What you need to know about competitors to differentiate yourself is usually available online. READ MORE

Choose Your Communication Method Wisely

Choose Your Communication Method Wisely

With all the options we have for communicating today, choosing the right method is more important than ever. It’s easy to become overly reliant on one form of communication, but as Marshall McLuhan wrote, “The medium is the message.” People sometimes assume that the communication method you choose in any given situation is a reflection of what you think of them and the level of importance you assign to the message.

Have you ever received a negative response to an email that you intended to be neutral or positive? Or, have you sent a text thinking it would be quicker than a phone call or email, but what resulted was an hour of texting messages back and forth? READ MORE

Tips for Periscope and Other Online Broadcasts – LA Media Trainer Weighs In

Tips for Periscope and Other Online Broadcasts – LA Media Trainer Weighs In

Tips for Periscope and Other Online Broadcasts - blog post by LA Media Trainer Lisa Elia of ExpertMediaTraining.com

If you decide to use Periscope, learn how to use it as well as you can. I don’t use Periscope because that’s not where my clients are, but I’ve tuned into others’ Periscope broadcasts and observed some of the problems that can occur. I’ve shared a link below from an article from Social Media Week, and I’ll add my tips that apply to just about any public broadcast:

1. Have someone online with you during your broadcast to quickly handle negative comments from trolls, so you can focus on communicating your message. Ideally this person should log on from a separate device and let you know you’re broadcasting. READ MORE

10 Easy Ways to Become a Better Listener in Media Interviews and in Life

10 Easy Ways to Become a Better Listener in Media Interviews and in Life

For most people, becoming a great communicator is a lifelong endeavor. One of the best ways to become a better communicator is to become a better listener. To be a good listener, you must improve your ability to concentrate and refrain from hastily jumping to conclusions about what others are saying or asking of you. You must be able to concentrate fully on what another person is saying in order to retain and process the information.

The best interviewers are astute listeners and observers. They are able to pick up on the smallest bits of information and the most minute cues (both verbal and nonverbal), to lead them to the next insightful question or comment. READ MORE

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